Last week the three judges on the Second District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles unanimously declared that parents who homeschool their children do not need to have formal teaching credentials.

This overturned the decision the judges made in February requiring homeschooling parents to possess credentials. In their decision, they stated, "It is important to recognize that it is not for us to consider, as a matter of policy, whether homeschooling should be permitted in California . That job is for the Legislature.  It is not the duty of the courts to make the law; we endeavor to interpret it."

The February decision outraged homeschoolers across the United States, and their response had prompted the California Teachers Asssociation to argue that "parents do not have an unfettered right to dictate the terms fo their children's education."

Over 166,000 children are estimated to be homeschooled in California, and because of the public pressure, the Second District Court of Appeal agreed to rehear the case.

The Los Angeles case-in-chief having to do with allegations of child abuse will still be heard, but the decision will be focused much more narrowly.

 
 

11 Comments

  1. Robert Kors says:

    I don't believe parents should need credentials. But I do think the children should be tested at the end of each year, to make sure they are learning at the right level. If they are not, they should be put back in public schools, so that they don't fall too far behind. We don't need a 21 year old who can't read or write; but wants to drink, drive or vote! (P.S. It would not let me post this at the site. Kept saying wrong anti-spam word)

  2. Robert Kors says:

    I don't believe parents should need credentials. But I do think the children should be tested at the end of each year, to make sure they are learning at the right level. If they are not, they should be put back in public schools, so that they don't fall too far behind. We don't need a 21 year old who can't read or write; but wants to drink, drive or vote! (P.S. It would not let me post this at the site. Kept saying wrong anti-spam word)

  3. Ann says:

    I agree parents shouldn't need credentials. However, a one time course to help them grasp what the kids need to learn and where to find resources could be a boon.

    Annual testing only works well if the family is teaching the same thing as the school. When I homeschooled, I opted not to teach evolution and approached all science from a Christian perspective. Evolutionary questions etc. would have hurt their chances at passing. Like so many things, homeschooling has become more political than it should be.

    Lest ye forget: we live in what is supposed to be a Republic (Pledge of Allegiance: and to the Republic for which it stands) not a demon-o-cracy. Within a Republic all of our rights are equally protected. Within a Demonocracy all are controlled by the majority, or in current practice by the vocal minority.

  4. Ann says:

    I agree parents shouldn't need credentials. However, a one time course to help them grasp what the kids need to learn and where to find resources could be a boon.

    Annual testing only works well if the family is teaching the same thing as the school. When I homeschooled, I opted not to teach evolution and approached all science from a Christian perspective. Evolutionary questions etc. would have hurt their chances at passing. Like so many things, homeschooling has become more political than it should be.

    Lest ye forget: we live in what is supposed to be a Republic (Pledge of Allegiance: and to the Republic for which it stands) not a demon-o-cracy. Within a Republic all of our rights are equally protected. Within a Demonocracy all are controlled by the majority, or in current practice by the vocal minority.

  5. Sarah says:

    The Californial Teacher's Association is right on – parents should not be given the last word on their children's education. What is to stop a parent from teaching their child that up is down and that 2 + 2 = 5? At least give the child a chance to succeed in the "real world" with some standards. And then they can decide for themselves whether up is down.. or up.

  6. Sarah says:

    The Californial Teacher's Association is right on – parents should not be given the last word on their children's education. What is to stop a parent from teaching their child that up is down and that 2 + 2 = 5? At least give the child a chance to succeed in the "real world" with some standards. And then they can decide for themselves whether up is down.. or up.

  7. Allison says:

    I think parents should have credentials. If they dropped out of school in grade 10, how can they be expected to do a proper job of teaching grade 11 level math.

  8. Allison says:

    I think parents should have credentials. If they dropped out of school in grade 10, how can they be expected to do a proper job of teaching grade 11 level math.

  9. Michael says:

    Parents do NOT need credentials to teach their own kids. If they choose to teach that 2+2=5, they are setting their own kids up for failure. If they choose to teach young earth creationism, they make it hard for their kids to succeed in biology. But, ultimately, it is the parents' freedom and right to be excellent and brilliant OR to be lousy and stupid.

  10. Michael says:

    Parents do NOT need credentials to teach their own kids. If they choose to teach that 2+2=5, they are setting their own kids up for failure. If they choose to teach young earth creationism, they make it hard for their kids to succeed in biology. But, ultimately, it is the parents' freedom and right to be excellent and brilliant OR to be lousy and stupid.

 
 
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