adjudication

Giving or pronouncing a judgment or decree. Also the judgment given.

 
 

affirmed

In the practice of the court of appeals, it means that the court of appeals has concluded that the lower court decision is correct and will stand as rendered by the lower court.

 
 

Amicus brief

Brief filed by a "friend of the court." Refers to a party that is allowed to provide information (usually in the form of a legal brief) to a court even though the party is not directly involved in the case at hand.

 
 

Amicus curiae

Latin for friend of the court. Refers to a party that is allowed to provide information (usually in the form of a legal brief) to a court even though the party is not directly involved in the case at hand.

 
 

answer

In litigation, the formal written statement by a defendant in a civil case that responds to a complaint, articulating the grounds for defense.

 
 

appeal

A request made after a trial by a party that has lost on one or more issues that a higher court review the decision to determine if it was correct. To make such a request is "to appeal" or "to take an appeal." One who appeals is called the "appellant;" the other party is the "appellee."

 
 

appellate court

A court having jurisdiction to hear appeals and review a trial court's procedure.

 
 

Article III

A federal judge who is appointed for life, during "good behavior," under Article III of the Constitution. Article III judges are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

 
 

assisted suicide

Assisted death, also known as assisted suicide, is death undertaken with the aid of another person. The term usually refers to medically assisted death or physician-assisted suicide (PAS), which is death that is assisted by a physician or other healthcare provider.

 
 

Attorney-client privilege

The privilege of a client to keep certain communications with his or her attorney confidential, where those communications relate to legal advice. Based upon this privilege, an attorney must protect confidential information about his or her client, and refrain from disclosing information the client has given in confidence.