At ReligiousLiberty.TV, we feature information from a wide variety of perspectives.  A posting on this site does not indicate endorsement of the views presented, but rather presents it with the intent to discuss and learn.

This is a set of 2 video clips from a Hindu perspective that discusses the attempts of Christians to evangelize non-Christians in India.  Are Christians engaging in sincere evangelism or opportunistic exploitation as the video producers claim? Is conversion being unfairly used as a price to pay in order to receive missionary aid?

The video also proposed a "Code of Ethics" for religious conversion which includes language that it should be the result of true spiritual change, not manipulation or coercion. This is likely to increasingly become a larger issue in a global economy and information society.  As this issue grows, churches will need re-evaluate their methods of spreading the gospel and seriously consider how they are being perceived in order to avoid sweeping attempts to ban all forms of proselytism.

If you have experience in this issue, please share!

 
 

4 Comments

  1. rlbolton says:

    The clips were interesting. It was good to see the Hindu perspective. I had heard the accusations leveled at Christians before, but didn't consider their perceptions accurate, I just thought they were unhappy with people's change. They seem to have a point in some situations. People should always have the power to choose their religion. Certainly accepting relief efforts, for instance, should never obligate a person to convert.

    On the other hand, a person who undergoes a spiritual and intellectual change in perspective should be allowed to convert. I think their weakest argument is forbidding conversion in the course of education, even for children. Education is a very effective way to bring change. But again, it must be a result of a spiritual and intellectual change, and not in any way coercive. There should be no expectation of conversion in exchange for education. It would have to be a by-product of learning more, representing a change in the person's perspective, not a commodity exchange, nor based on manipulation, or indoctrination. But here it gets a little fuzzy… because sometimes people who dislike someone else's conversion think it is one of these, when it is really a spiritual and intellectual change in the person's perspective.

    Much to think about…

    RBolton

  2. rlbolton says:

    The clips were interesting. It was good to see the Hindu perspective. I had heard the accusations leveled at Christians before, but didn't consider their perceptions accurate, I just thought they were unhappy with people's change. They seem to have a point in some situations. People should always have the power to choose their religion. Certainly accepting relief efforts, for instance, should never obligate a person to convert.

    On the other hand, a person who undergoes a spiritual and intellectual change in perspective should be allowed to convert. I think their weakest argument is forbidding conversion in the course of education, even for children. Education is a very effective way to bring change. But again, it must be a result of a spiritual and intellectual change, and not in any way coercive. There should be no expectation of conversion in exchange for education. It would have to be a by-product of learning more, representing a change in the person's perspective, not a commodity exchange, nor based on manipulation, or indoctrination. But here it gets a little fuzzy… because sometimes people who dislike someone else's conversion think it is one of these, when it is really a spiritual and intellectual change in the person's perspective.

    Much to think about…

    RBolton

  3. Alison Agins says:

    It is interesting.
    I took a look at Hindu Times and I also see an agenda there. I remember looking at it a few years ago.

    About what was said regarding the methods that Christians have used to try to convert Hindus as well as other religions. I was reminded of what I had recently read about Navajos and other American First Peoples here and in Canada. For that matter in South America too. How the Christians would remove the children from their parents and put them in schools where the children were in many cases were abused. This has happened all over the world when you think about it. China, Australia and the South Pacific.

    When you look at what has been done to convert the "natives" it really can make you feel ashamed. What has been done in the name of Christ!

    And yet, there it is a command. "Go you unto all the world". But, he followed it up with how to do it. And then we have the examples of the disciples and Paul. There never was force, or any sort of underhanded ways.

    I'm hoping that our missions are always making sure that those that are in the field are there with hearts full of love and good intentions and do not operate with a paternal attitude towards those that they are there to bring to Christ.

    And when needs arise it is often the Christians that are there first to help. Some my have motives other than bringing help to the suffering, but one has to really wonder why the majority of help is coming from Christians.

  4. Alison Agins says:

    It is interesting.
    I took a look at Hindu Times and I also see an agenda there. I remember looking at it a few years ago.

    About what was said regarding the methods that Christians have used to try to convert Hindus as well as other religions. I was reminded of what I had recently read about Navajos and other American First Peoples here and in Canada. For that matter in South America too. How the Christians would remove the children from their parents and put them in schools where the children were in many cases were abused. This has happened all over the world when you think about it. China, Australia and the South Pacific.

    When you look at what has been done to convert the "natives" it really can make you feel ashamed. What has been done in the name of Christ!

    And yet, there it is a command. "Go you unto all the world". But, he followed it up with how to do it. And then we have the examples of the disciples and Paul. There never was force, or any sort of underhanded ways.

    I'm hoping that our missions are always making sure that those that are in the field are there with hearts full of love and good intentions and do not operate with a paternal attitude towards those that they are there to bring to Christ.

    And when needs arise it is often the Christians that are there first to help. Some my have motives other than bringing help to the suffering, but one has to really wonder why the majority of help is coming from Christians.

 
 
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