Archive for: May, 2011

Church for Single Mormons Comes with Pressure to Marry (Washington Post)

EXCERPT: It's Tuesday night Bible study, which at this Crystal City Mormon chapel looks a bit like a mixer. Pews are filled with people in jeans and flip-flops, many texting. The night begins with a prayer before segueing quickly into an ice-breaker trivia game and a pizza social. Not surprising for a church made up exclusively of singles – 800 […]

 
 

Religious Liberty on North Dakota Ballot (Devils Lake Journal)

EXCERPT: A North Dakota constitutional amendment about religious freedom will be on the state ballot next year. Secretary of State Al Jaeger says Wednesday that the initiative's supporters got enough signatures to put the issue to a vote. It will be Measure 3 on the June primary election ballot. The proposed amendment says lawmakers may restrict religious behavior only if […]

 
 

Proposal to Ban Circumcision Draws Strong Criticism (Baptist Joint Committee for Religious Liberty)

EXCERPT: At Religion Clause, Howard Friedman notes that Santa Monica could become the second California city to place on the 2012 ballot a ban on circumcision. A similar measure will be up for public referendum in San Francisco, prompting fierce opposition by many religious liberty advocates and others. Here's a sample: The SF Chronicle's editorial board urges voters to turn […]

 
 

Article18: Mexico — Confirmed Presence of Major Islamic Terrorist Group Near U.S. Border; Former Killer Preaches to Violent Gangsters

Article18: Mexico — Confirmed Presence of Major Islamic Terrorist Group Near U.S. Border; Former Killer Preaches to Violent Gangsters

By Martin Surridge – The last week has brought some changes to Article18. In addition to the added subtitles for each article, a new emblem is featured at the bottom of each entry, created by artist and musician Bradley Kenyon, who also made the globe logo for Article18. I want to thank Bradley for his contribution to the blog as […]

 
 

Judge Rules Against Plaintiffs Claiming Murfreesboro Mosque Violated Their Rights (The Republic)

EXCERPT: A judge has ruled that the construction of a new mosque in Rutherford County does not harm the residents who sued the county over it, but allowed them to move forward on claims the county violated an open meetings law. Plaintiffs' attorney Joe Brandon Jr. had argued that the mosque violated his clients' constitutional rights, claiming that the Islamic […]

 
 

Tennesee Senate Approves Bill to Ban Teaching of Homosexuality in Schools (Boston Globe)

EXCERPT: A bill passed yesterday by the Tennessee Senate would forbid public school teachers and students in grades kindergarten through eight from discussing the fact that some people are gay. Opponents deride the measure as the "don't say gay bill." They say it is unfair to the children of gay parents and could lead to more bullying. Supporters say it […]

 
 

Article18: Laos — Four Christian Women Raped and Executed by Laotian Military Along Vietnam Border

Article18: Laos — Four Christian Women Raped and Executed by Laotian Military Along Vietnam Border

By Martin Surridge – Just a short entry this week. My apologies to those who were looking for an Article18 post last week. As a teacher, the end of May can be rather hectic, which is why this is the first post since the end of April. I wish I had the opportunity to do more in regards to religious […]

 
 

Church, State, and the Postal Service: The Contentious History of Sunday Mail Delivery

Church, State, and the Postal Service: The Contentious History of Sunday Mail Delivery

Between its inception in 1775 and 1912, postal employees delivered mail seven (7) days a week. In the early 1800s, religious leaders became concerned that employees were forced to work on the “Christian Sabbath,” or Sunday, and began to petition Congress to use its Article I powers to disallow Sunday delivery. This concern reached a fevered pitch in 1810 when Congress required post offices to open at least one hour on Sunday. Outraged that Congress had thus enforced Sunday desecration, religious leaders began to clamor for legislation that would outlaw Sunday operations.

 
 

OPINION: The Good Old Days? Not Quite

By Brent Buttler – In these days in which people's rights seem up for grabs there is a tendency to wish we could go back to the good old days when people had more freedom to live as they chose to live. However, upon further research I have discovered that people's freedoms have been eroding away for quite some time. […]

 
 

A Muslim American Reflects on Osama Bin Laden's Death (Washington Post)

EXCERPT: By Arshad Chowdhury Osama bin Laden's many victims include, first and foremost, those who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and their grieving families, the soldiers sent to war and the loved ones they left behind, and a new generation forced to grow up in a more polarized and paranoid world. For all of them, bin Laden's death must bring […]