Supreme Court

Supreme Court not likely to make individual FBI agents pay for allegedly violating Religious Freedom Restoration Act

Supreme Court of the United States

On October 6, 2020, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case on the issue of whether individual FBI agents can be held financially liable if they are found to have violated the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.  The underlying case involves Muslim-Americans who alleged that individual FBI agents put them on the "no fly" list after they refused to act as informants against fellow Muslims in terrorism-related investigations.

 
 

"I dissent!" A Survey of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Religion Clause Jurisprudence

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 2016. Official Supreme Court portrait.

Ginsburg wrote little on the religion clauses, but she frequently joined with those Justices who favored a strong separation of church and state. 

 
 

Founders’ First Freedom urges Supreme Court to Restore Title VII Workplace Religious Accommodation Standard

Photo Credit: DepositPhotos.com

Today, Founders’ First Freedom, Inc. filed an amicus brief urging the United States Supreme Court to revisit and restore the workplace religious accommodation standard found in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

 
 

Court rules agency can decide if employers must provide contraceptive coverage

Supreme Court of the United States

Supreme Court sidesteps the free exercise claim and grants government agencies the power to determine whether to apply the ACA contraceptive mandates to employers. 

 
 

Did the Supreme Court open the door to regulation of religious schools?

Did the Supreme Court open the door to regulation of religious schools?

With the death of state Blaine Amendments this week, religious schools that welcome state money might find that they are now subject to regulation that may undermine their very reason for existence. 

 
 

Soros-backed bid to eliminate anti-prostitution pledge loses at SCOTUS

Soros-backed bid to eliminate anti-prostitution pledge loses at SCOTUS

The Supreme Court has ruled against George Soros' Open Society Foundations and upheld a law requiring foreign NGOs receiving funds to sign an anti-prostitution pledge.

 
 

Court strikes down Louisiana law that abortion doctors must have admitting privileges at local hospital

Supreme Court of the United States

This morning the Supreme Court struck down a Louisiana law that required doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. The issue in June Medical Services LLC v. Russo, was whether this limit actually protected the health of pregnant women and wasn’t in place just to make it more difficult to have an abortion. This was very similar to the issue the Court last visited in 2016 (Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt) when it overturned a Texas abortion doctor admitting privileges requirement.

 
 

Supreme Court considers standing and medical necessity of admitting privileges in Louisiana abortion case

Supreme Court considers standing and medical necessity of admitting privileges in Louisiana abortion case

esterday the Supreme Court heard oral arguments (link to transcript) in the Louisiana abortion case, Russo v. June Medical Services. This case is a challenge to a new Louisiana state law that requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a local hospital within 30 miles. Because the admitting privileges requirements can be onerous, such as admitting at […]

 
 

Supreme Court finds Puerto Rico court lacked jurisdiction to seize Catholic assets to pay school pension obligations

Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court ruled today per curiam that the Puerto Rico Supreme Court erred when it determined that the "Roman Catholic and Apostolic Church" was responsible for properly administering a pension plan for the employees of Catholic Schools Trust.

 
 

Supreme Court declines to hear Sabbath accommodation case

Darrell Patterson

The Supreme court has decided against hearing a workplace accommodation case involving a Seventh-day Adventist, but hints that it may revisit employer accommodation standards in the future.