• Greg Hamilton and Steve McPherson of the Northwest Religious Liberty Association testified before the Idaho House State Affairs Committee - January 26, 2015
  • Gregory Houston Holt, aka Abdul Maalik Muhammad
  • Supreme Court Plans to Make National Decision on Same-Sex Marriage — What it Means
  • Supreme Court Considers First Amendment Ramifications of Church Sign Ordinance
  • Opinion: A Different Perspective on the Year 2014
  • Greg Hamilton and Steve McPherson of the Northwest Religious Liberty Association testified before the Idaho House State Affairs Committee - January 26, 2015

    Idaho: Northwest Religious Liberty Association Calls for Conscience Exemption to Anti-Discrimination Legislation

    This week, in four days of tes­ti­mony, the Idaho House State Affairs Com­mit­tee has been con­sid­er­ing House Bill 2 (HB2), that would add anti-discrimination pro­tec­tions for Ida­hoans based on sex­ual ori­en­ta­tion and gen­der iden­tity. Advo­cates have been pro­mot­ing the “Add the Words” bill for nine years and this is the first year that the Leg­is­la­ture has held hearings.

  • Gregory Houston Holt, aka Abdul Maalik Muhammad

    U.S. Supreme Court Unanimously Upholds Right of Prisoner to Wear Beard

    By Michael Peabody — The U.S. Supreme Court issued a unan­i­mous deci­sion today that the Arkansas Depart­ment of Cor­rec­tion vio­lated the Reli­gious Land Use and Insti­tu­tion­al­ized Per­sons Act (RLUIPA) when it pro­hib­ited a pris­oner from grow­ing a 1/2 inch beard in accor­dance with his reli­gious beliefs.

  • Supreme Court Plans to Make National Decision on Same-Sex Marriage — What it Means

    Supreme Court Plans to Make National Decision on Same-Sex Marriage — What it Means

    By Jason Hines, PhD — The Court will answer two ques­tions. First, “does the Four­teenth Amend­ment require a state to license a mar­riage between two peo­ple of the same sex?” Sec­ond, “does the Four­teenth Amend­ment require a state to rec­og­nize a mar­riage between two peo­ple of the same sex when their mar­riage was law­fully licensed and per­formed out-of-state?” These ques­tions cre­ate three pos­si­ble outcomes.

  • Supreme Court Considers First Amendment Ramifications of Church Sign Ordinance

    Supreme Court Considers First Amendment Ramifications of Church Sign Ordinance

    On Mon­day, Jan­u­ary 12, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argu­ments on the case of whether a local town ordi­nance vio­lates the First Amend­ment rights of churches when the ordi­nance lim­its the size, quan­tity, and dura­tion of church signs when polit­i­cal signs are not sim­i­larly lim­ited. Attor­neys for the town of Gilbert, Ari­zona have argued that the ordi­nance is not dis­crim­i­na­tory because all non-commercial event signs have the same restric­tions. Attor­neys for Clyde Reed, the pas­tor of the Good News Pres­by­ter­ian Church argued that just because the city claims the ordi­nance appears to be facially neu­tral toward reli­gious free speech does not mean that it is actu­ally neutral.

  • Opinion: A Different Perspective on the Year 2014

    Opinion: A Different Perspective on the Year 2014

    By Fabian Car­ballo — 2014 was a very inter­est­ing year, full of ironies and reoc­cur­ring themes. Here are some of the biggest sto­ries that con­sumed our national atten­tion for bet­ter or worse.

 

Most Recent

Idaho: Northwest Religious Liberty Association Calls for Conscience Exemption to Anti-Discrimination Legislation

Greg Hamilton and Steve McPherson of the Northwest Religious Liberty Association testified before the Idaho House State Affairs Committee - January 26, 2015

This week, in four days of tes­ti­mony, the Idaho House State Affairs Com­mit­tee has been con­sid­er­ing House Bill 2 (HB2), that would add anti-discrimination pro­tec­tions for Ida­hoans based on sex­ual ori­en­ta­tion and gen­der iden­tity. Advo­cates have been pro­mot­ing the “Add the Words” bill for nine years and this is the first year that the Leg­is­la­ture has held hearings.

 
 

U.S. Supreme Court Unanimously Upholds Right of Prisoner to Wear Beard

Gregory Houston Holt, aka Abdul Maalik Muhammad

By Michael Peabody — The U.S. Supreme Court issued a unan­i­mous deci­sion today that the Arkansas Depart­ment of Cor­rec­tion vio­lated the Reli­gious Land Use and Insti­tu­tion­al­ized Per­sons Act (RLUIPA) when it pro­hib­ited a pris­oner from grow­ing a 1/2 inch beard in accor­dance with his reli­gious beliefs.

 
 

Supreme Court Plans to Make National Decision on Same-Sex Marriage — What it Means

Supreme Court Plans to Make National Decision on Same-Sex Marriage — What it Means

By Jason Hines, PhD — The Court will answer two ques­tions. First, “does the Four­teenth Amend­ment require a state to license a mar­riage between two peo­ple of the same sex?” Sec­ond, “does the Four­teenth Amend­ment require a state to rec­og­nize a mar­riage between two peo­ple of the same sex when their mar­riage was law­fully licensed and per­formed out-of-state?” These ques­tions cre­ate three pos­si­ble outcomes.

 
 

Supreme Court Considers First Amendment Ramifications of Church Sign Ordinance

Supreme Court Considers First Amendment Ramifications of Church Sign Ordinance

On Mon­day, Jan­u­ary 12, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argu­ments on the case of whether a local town ordi­nance vio­lates the First Amend­ment rights of churches when the ordi­nance lim­its the size, quan­tity, and dura­tion of church signs when polit­i­cal signs are not sim­i­larly lim­ited. Attor­neys for the town of Gilbert, Ari­zona have argued that the ordi­nance is not dis­crim­i­na­tory because all non-commercial event signs have the same restric­tions. Attor­neys for Clyde Reed, the pas­tor of the Good News Pres­by­ter­ian Church argued that just because the city claims the ordi­nance appears to be facially neu­tral toward reli­gious free speech does not mean that it is actu­ally neutral.

 
 

Opinion: A Different Perspective on the Year 2014

By Fabian Car­ballo — 2014 was a very inter­est­ing year, full of ironies and reoc­cur­ring themes. Here are some of the biggest sto­ries that con­sumed our national atten­tion for bet­ter or worse.

 
 

EDITORIAL: To Preserve Faith, Keep Church and State Separate

EDITORIAL: To Preserve Faith, Keep Church and State Separate

Last week, World­Net­Daily pub­lished an edi­to­r­ial by Scott Lively where he scolds Amer­i­can Chris­tians for allow­ing reli­gious plu­ral­ism to become accepted. Reli­gious plu­ral­ism, Lively argues, vio­lates the First Com­mand­ment which states, “Thou shall have no other gods before Me.”

In his arti­cle, enti­tled “The Deadly ‘Reli­gious Lib­erty’ Trap,” Lively argues that the “wall of sep­a­ra­tion of church and state” metaphor had been wrong­fully used as a “as a jus­ti­fi­ca­tion for declar­ing all reli­gions to be equal with Chris­tian­ity in Amer­ica, and equally sub­servient to sec­u­lar human­ist authority.”

Lively’s solu­tion to this sit­u­a­tion “is to stop argu­ing for ‘reli­gious lib­erty’ and resume our procla­ma­tion of the supe­ri­or­ity of Christ and His Word over all oppos­ing faiths (along with tol­er­ance for peo­ple of other faiths – that’s how it worked before [Ever­son v Board of Edu­ca­tion (1947)]. Its goal must be noth­ing less than an offi­cial reaf­fir­ma­tion of the Bible as our legal and cul­tural foun­da­tion, which would require over­turn­ing Ever­son and its juridi­cal progeny.”

 
 

7th Circuit Rules Challengers to Ministerial Housing Exemption Lacked Standing

7th Circuit Rules Challengers to Ministerial Housing Exemption Lacked Standing

On Novem­ber 13, 2014, the Sev­enth Cir­cuit Court of Appeals ruled that an athe­ist group chal­leng­ing a tax-exempt hous­ing ben­e­fit only avail­able to clergy lacked stand­ing to bring the suit because mem­bers of the athe­ist group could not demon­strate that they had suf­fered an injury as a result of the clergy tax-exemption.

 
 

Hard-fought religious freedom something to celebrate this Thanksgiving

Hard-fought religious freedom something to celebrate this Thanksgiving

House­holds through­out the United States are cel­e­brat­ing a pres­i­den­tially des­ig­nated Thanks­giv­ing Day. It pro­vides us an oppor­tu­nity to reflect on the bless­ings we enjoy as a nation and personally.

The his­tory of this hol­i­day goes back to the arrival of the Pil­grims at Ply­mouth, Mass., in the late autumn of 1620. Although the New World saw inter­mit­tent Euro­pean activ­ity after the arrival of Christo­pher Colum­bus in 1492, in the minds of many, Amer­i­can his­tory truly began with the Pilgrims.

Because most of the occu­pants of the Mayflower had belonged to a per­se­cuted reli­gious minor­ity in Eng­land — Con­gre­ga­tion­al­ists, part of the dis­sent­ing church move­ment — they came seek­ing free­dom to prac­tice reli­gion in con­cert with each individual’s own con­science. But the Pil­grims’ quest was by no means the only rea­son Amer­ica came to be viewed as a shel­ter from reli­gious per­se­cu­tion and intolerance.

 
 

Religious Freedom Advocate Lee Boothby Dies

Religious Freedom Advocate Lee Boothby Dies

On Novem­ber 6, 2014, attor­ney Lee Boothby died at the age of 81 in Berrien Springs, Michi­gan. Boothby was known for his relent­less advo­cacy for reli­gious liberty.

 
 

Breaking News: Facing National Pressure, Houston Mayor Drops Subpoenas of Pastors

On Octo­ber 29, 2014, Hous­ton mayor Anissa Parker announced that she is ask­ing city attor­neys to drop the con­tro­ver­sial sub­poena of pas­tors’ com­mu­ni­ca­tions. Parker claimed the sub­poe­nas were still appro­pri­ate but that she did not “want to have a national debate on free­dom of reli­gion when my pur­pose is to defend … a city ordi­nance.” Read more at Chris­tian­ity Today.