Military

EXCERPT: Jan Paulsen on the Church and Military Combat

As the church expresses itself on this issue and offers counsel to both its own members and broader society, it must never allow itself to forget this one unchangeable fact: the God we serve is a healer and a Savior. Healing and saving are also the first business of the church. As individuals struggle with these questions—and perhaps make choices that, in hindsight, they wish they had not—the church must constantly reflect God's infinite, healing love.

 
 

U.S. House Committee Votes to Strengthen Military Chaplains' Liberty of Conscience

U.S. House Committee Votes to Strengthen Military Chaplains' Liberty of Conscience

The U.S. House Armed Services Committee has adopted Congressman Todd Akin's (R-Missouri) amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) which creates a statutory conscience protection clause for members of the military in general and military chaplains in particular.

 
 

Should Congress Continue to Fund the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom?

Should Congress Continue to Fund the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom?

(This article was written as a contribution to a Liberty Magazine Round Table discussion. Read the other responses and contribute your thoughts at http://www.libertymagazine.org/index.php?id=1665 ) By Michael D. Peabody – In August 2011, the Pew Research Institute released a study, Rising Restrictions on Religion, which found that more than a third of the population of the world lives in nations where government […]

 
 

Article18: Afghanistan — The Land that Freedom Forgot; A Profile on Religious Persecution in One of the World's Most Depressing Nations (Liberty Magazine)

Article18: Afghanistan — The Land that Freedom Forgot; A Profile on Religious Persecution in One of the World's Most Depressing Nations (Liberty Magazine)

The following excerpt is from an article written by RLTV associate editor and Article18 creator Martin Surridge that appeared in the November/December 2011 issue of Liberty Magazine. EXCERPT: The sound and smell of motorcycles roaring down a street in Kandahar must have overwhelmed 16-year-old Atifa in the moments before the attack. Before she really knew what was happening, one of […]

 
 

Is Christian "Just War" Just Like Jihad? (Patheos)

EXCERPT: Christian and Islamic views of warfare are closer than we have been led to believe. When it comes to questions of war and peace, is American Christianity more like Muhammad or Jesus? Since 9/11, such a question has seemed outrageous to many Americans. But perhaps the offense is grounded in some unhelpful assumptions. Here in the Bible Belt, many […]

 
 

Article18: Cuba — Three Protestant Pastors Interrogated; Roman Catholic Church in Havana Helps Free 126 Prisoners of Conscience

Article18: Cuba — Three Protestant Pastors Interrogated; Roman Catholic Church in Havana Helps Free 126 Prisoners of Conscience

Like the classic American cars that drive up and down Havana's hot streets, communist Cuba is a country from another era–Cold War isolationism, a American trade embargo that began fifty years ago, and a pair of aging dictator-brothers who have ruled the nation and restricted its freedom for decades. But while Cuba may be living in the past in many respects, its religious freedoms are a curious blend of old-fashioned totalitarian crackdown and modern globalist acquiescence.

 
 

Obama's Olive Branch Doctrine (PART II) Interfaith Tolerance & the Reshaping of U.S. Foreign Policy

President Obama's middle-ground approach to the credible and well-established “Clash of Civilizations” theme – when formulating international religious freedom policy – is best understood when placed on a scale between tolerance and international consensus (an interfaith, “soft-power” approach), and America's constitutional ideal of religious freedom and human rights (an Evangelical and “exacting” approach). Yet both policy methods delimit religious freedom, threatening it altogether.

 
 

EDITORIAL: Hero without a gun – Washington Times

Desmond T. Doss was 23 years old when he was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1942. The lanky Lynchburg, Va., native was much like other young men of the Greatest Generation, but one thing set Desmond apart from the other new troops. He was a devout Seventh Day Adventist and refused to touch a weapon. Some of the men in his training unit made jokes about him, others threatened him, but Desmond held firm to his beliefs. . . . >>>

 
 

Obama's Olive Branch Doctrine: Religion & the Path of Democratic Reform in the Arab-Muslim World (PART I)

Obama's Olive Branch Doctrine: Religion & the Path of Democratic Reform in the Arab-Muslim World (PART I)

By Gregory W. Hamilton, President Northwest Religious Liberty Association (NRLA) March 15, 2011 President Barack Obama came to Cairo in 2009 with the purpose of announcing to the Arab-Muslim world that he was not following his predecessor's "Democracy Project" as a matter of U.S. Middle East policy. One could call this Obama's "Olive Branch Doctrine": the message that interfaith tolerance […]

 
 

New book addresses Conscientious Objection in today's military

New book addresses Conscientious Objection in today's military

Since its organization in 1863 the Seventh-day Adventist Church has been counter cultural.  In its Christian witness to modern society it has advocated keeping the seventh-day Sabbath, vegetarianism, abstinence from tobacco and alcohol and refusal of its members to bear arms.  But the stance on the refusal to bear arms has seen a metamorphous in modern times.  Today more Seventh-day […]