Free Speech

Pregnancy center case is Supreme Court's third forced-speech case this term

Pregnancy center case is Supreme Court's third forced-speech case this term

In its third case on the issue of state-required speech this term, the Supreme Court has agreed to hear a California case involving whether the state can compel pro-life pregnancy counseling centers to post notices about the existence of publicly-funded abortion and contraceptive services, and requires disclosures if the centers or personnel are unlicensed.

 
 

Kentucky Appeals Court upholds free speech rights of Christian printer in narrow opinion

Kentucky Appeals Court upholds free speech rights of Christian printer in narrow opinion

In a narrowly drafted opinion, the Kentucky Court of Appeals has ruled that the government could not compel a Christian printer to promote messages that violated his religious beliefs.

 
 

Trump order essentially affirms Johnson Amendment

Trump order essentially affirms Johnson Amendment

Last Thursday, President Donald Trump marked the National Day of Prayer with an executive order that at most expressed the administration's desire that the Department of the Treasury should not unnecessarily threaten the tax-exempt status of religious non-profit organizations if they engage in political activity. Despite stating during the campaign that he would "destroy" the Johnson Amendment, the administration ultimately made a benign gesture affirming existing law while describing its parameters and limits.

 
 

Why the United States should not give up control of the Internet naming system

Why the United States should not give up control of the Internet naming system

Congress has two more days to act to save free speech, but in a year when the Internet has been the biggest thorn in the side of both parties, my guess is that Congress will tragically let control of ICANN slide away. The world deserves the full range of First Amendment protections of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, free exercise of religion, and other freedoms that only the United States is constitutionally obligated to maintain.

 
 

Ideological Diversity Endangered on Modern College Campuses

Ideological Diversity Endangered on Modern College Campuses

Guest Opinion: College students are, for lack of a better word, being brainwashed. They are being fed the left-wing ideology, without the necessary diversity of opinion. These students then graduate, having internalized what they've been taught, as the absolute truth. You cannot debate them because they won't debate. They will express anger at opposing views and refuse to listen.

 
 

Free Exercise After Obergefell: Warnings from the Dissent

Free Exercise After Obergefell:  Warnings from the Dissent

Statements of Justices Roberts, Thomas, and Alito on free exercise of religion in light of the same-sex marriage decision.

 
 

Supreme Court Rules Sign Ordinance Adversely Affecting Church Fails Strict Scrutiny

Supreme Court Rules Sign Ordinance Adversely Affecting Church Fails Strict Scrutiny

fter a lengthy legal battle, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled unanimously (see Reed v. Gilbert  , decided June 18, 2015) that a town cannot bar church signs when it allows similar signs promoting political or ideological viewpoints. In 2007, Good News Community Church sued Gilbert, Arizona, when the town enforced a law banning the church from posting road signs […]

 
 

Idaho: Northwest Religious Liberty Association Calls for Conscience Exemption to Anti-Discrimination Legislation

Greg Hamilton and Steve McPherson of the Northwest Religious Liberty Association testified before the Idaho House State Affairs Committee - January 26, 2015

This week, in four days of testimony, the Idaho House State Affairs Committee has been considering House Bill 2 (HB2), that would add anti-discrimination protections for Idahoans based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Advocates have been promoting the "Add the Words" bill for nine years and this is the first year that the Legislature has held hearings.

 
 

Supreme Court Considers First Amendment Ramifications of Church Sign Ordinance

Supreme Court Considers First Amendment Ramifications of Church Sign Ordinance

On Monday, January 12, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the case of whether a local town ordinance violates the First Amendment rights of churches when the ordinance limits the size, quantity, and duration of church signs when political signs are not similarly limited. Attorneys for the town of Gilbert, Arizona have argued that the ordinance is not discriminatory because all non-commercial event signs have the same restrictions. Attorneys for Clyde Reed, the pastor of the Good News Presbyterian Church argued that just because the city claims the ordinance appears to be facially neutral toward religious free speech does not mean that it is actually neutral.

 
 

RUSSIA: "We still cry when we remember the burned books" (Forum 18)

RUSSIA: "We still cry when we remember the burned books" (Forum 18)

A Tatarstan court had to reject the prosecutor's suit to have a further 18 books by or about the Turkish Islamic theologian Said Nursi declared "extremist" as police had already burned them. According to a police letter seen by Forum 18 News Service, police claim not to have received a court decision ordering their return to the owner, Nakiya Sharifullina, who had controversially been convicted for "extremist" activity. "We still cry when we remember the burned books," a local Muslim told Forum 18, adding that they "asked God that these people repent for their actions, since in these books were verses of the Holy Koran". Four further Nursi titles, plus more Jehovah's Witness publications, have been declared "extremist" and banned. Websites or pages that host religious materials controversially banned as "extremist" have similarly been banned and added to Russia's Register of Banned Sites.