Archive for: 2019

Supreme Court rules that Title VII EEOC filing requirements are mandatory but not jurisdictional

Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court issued a ruling on June 3, 2019, in a case (Fort Bend County v. Davis)  involving whether a court may hear a discrimination case where the plaintiff fails to raise all charges in an initial EEOC complaint.  The Court found that the Title VII’s rules are procedural, not jurisdictional, and as such procedural defenses need to be raised early in a case.

 
 

In Congress, Federal Equality Act as drafted faces feminist opposition

In Congress, Federal Equality Act as drafted faces feminist opposition

Legislation that would add sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 threatens women's bodily privacy says feminist organization

 
 

Podcast highlights religious liberty and social justice through Adventist lens

Podcast host Peter Chung and guest Ivor Meyers

Peter Chung, a history teacher at San Gabriel Academy in Southern California, hosts a religious liberty and social justice podcast series, "Healing the Nations," that addresses current issues "through the lens of the historical religious liberty view of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

 
 

Vatican calls for religious freedom amidst competing strains of secularism and fundamentalism

The Little Sisters of The Poor rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC March 23, 2016.  -  American Life League - Creative Commons license

The Vatican has released a document, “Religious Liberty for the Good of All,” calling for an expansion of religious liberty in the face of competing strains of religious fundamentalism and secular intolerance. While not addressing each and every conflict, the document is intended to express the relationship between civil law and religious law in the context of theology, anthropology, and political science.

 
 

Another cake case gives Court opportunity to resolve free exercise confusion

Supreme Court of the United States

Too broad an exception from neutral, generally applicable law, and protections against discrimination vanish. Too narrow an exception and free exercise of religion protections vanish. What is clear is that these cases will continue to make their way through the lower courts with differing results until the Supreme Court makes a decision.  

 
 

New York Court Upholds Emergency Mandatory Vaccination

New York Court Upholds Emergency Mandatory Vaccination

Taking the significance of the public health emergency and religious beliefs into account when deciding what to do in these circumstances is difficult. It is too easy to dismiss religious claims as unscientific and foolish in the face of a measles outbreak, but in so doing it behooves the parties to seek a compromise

 
 

Supreme Court Requests Solicitor General's Opinion on Sabbath Accommodation Case

Supreme Court Requests Solicitor General's Opinion on Sabbath Accommodation Case

The value of the Patterson case does not merely hinge on its facts, which would likely have to be developed at the trial level, but more importantly, it provides a vehicle for the Circuit courts to obtain needed guidance from the Supreme Court in order to consistently interpret Title VII religious accommodation requirements. 

 
 

Historic Churches, WWI Crosses, and Constitutional Confusion at Supreme Court

Historic Churches, WWI Crosses, and Constitutional Confusion at Supreme Court

Whether a religious symbol or edifice needs to masquerade as a secular structure in order to escape Establishment Clause scrutiny is at issue in two major cases at the United State Supreme Court.

 
 

Founders' First Freedom Announces Essay Contest Winners

Founders' First Freedom Announces Essay Contest Winners

Founders' First Freedom is pleased to announce the Founders’ First Freedom High School and College Essay Contest winners.

 
 

Supreme Court: The 8th Amendment's Excessive Fines Clause is incorporated against the states via the 14th Amendment

Supreme Court: The 8th Amendment's Excessive Fines Clause is incorporated against the states via the 14th Amendment

This morning, the United States Supreme Court issued a ruling that the 14th Amendment applies the "Excessive Fines Clause" of the 8th Amendment to the states.